December 2008
The Paul Penders Blog is now live!

Actively maintained by the entire company, the Blog is the online home of the Paul Penders family with company and product news as well as updates from Malaysia and China. It also contains posts that reflect the heart and soul of its people, with inspirational quotes, stories of daily accomplishments and discussions about the issues that matter most.

All members of the Paul Penders community are invited to visit the Blog and contribute....
 

To go to the Blog, please click here.
In This Issue:
Paul Penders in Korea
Awards
Price Reduction
Nanoparticles

Paul Penders Products Flourish in Korea

Over the past three years, Paul Penders has established a loyal following in South Korea. More than 3,000 individual distributors currently sell Paul Penders hair care, skin care and cosmetic products through a multi-level marketing system organized by the Seoul-based company, FORYOU.

While other multi-level marketing companies such as Avon and Mary Kay have languished in Korea, FORYOU credits its success to the high quality of the Paul Penders line, Korean consumers’ growing interest in natural products and the extensive educational programs it provides.

Paul Penders products incorporate only natural ingredients, using LevensESSENTIE Gold
TM, a time-tested combination of 22 herbs and nutrients, as a base. This contrasts with many other products sold in Korea that claim to be all-natural but in fact often contain harmful synthetic chemicals.

“From the first moment I met Paul, I felt that he was very honest and trustworthy,” says Mr. Yoo, the president of the Beauty Academy and R&D manager of FORYOU company. “He cares deeply about the products he sells and wants to make sure they are as safe and effective as possible.”

As consumers worldwide become more aware of the dangers of certain synthetic ingredients, they are increasingly selecting natural products. With a highly educated and cosmopolitan population, demand for natural skin care products in Korea is also rising.

It’s particularly noteworthy that Paul Penders’ presence in Korea has expanded so quickly solely on the basis of word-of-mouth recommendations. Mr. Yoo believes that much of the reason for this is the in-depth knowledge of its distributors.

“We have a training center where we instruct distributors in the techniques of massage, skin care, product sales and management,” he says.  “This helps them explain how the products work and why they are so different from other skin care brands. Consumers then have an understanding of why natural products are better for them and how the Paul Penders products are unique.”

This training is comprehensive – about one third of FORYOU distributors own beauty shops, and many use the skills they learn to establish businesses specifically to market the Paul Penders products.

“Beauty shops are an excellent place to talk about skin care,” says Mr. Yoo, “because people are relaxed and interested in learning about new ways to look their best.”

Although the full Paul Penders hair care, skin care and cosmetic lines are available in Korea, the most popular products are skin care kits containing day cream, night cream, exfoliant and toning spray. The kits, called “30 Day Spa”, contain a 4 to 6 week supply of products that are designed to complete and systematic facial care.

Paul Penders Wins Two Awards in U.S.

After an extensive review of more than 100 natural cosmetic brands including Aubrey Organics, Thalgo, MD Skincare and many more, H2O Magazine has honored Paul Penders with two product awards.

Intensive Clarifying Therapy (ICT) and olive-oil based Time Release Shampoo were cited for their originality, unique formulation, functionality and excellent results. Both were evaluated by the magazine’s testing panel, which tried the products, analyzed ingredients and studied the production process.

During this evaluation, the H2O beauty experts gained a greater appreciation for the all-natural herbal ingredients used in the products, many of which are sourced from Asia and Langkawi Geopark.

In early 2009, a team of H2O magazine journalists will travel to Langkawi Geopark to learn more about this unique area and the Paul Penders product line. Planned articles include an in-depth interview with Dr. Ghani, a Paul Penders scientist and herbalist who will take the reporters on a walking tour through the jungles of Langkawi Geopark where he will discuss the local herbs and plants and their many uses.

Dr. Ghani is currently researching pegaga, an indigenous plant listed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as one of 10 global “wonder herbs”, and is working to formulate natural perfumes from the organic plants growing at Langkawi Geopark. He plans to open an alternative healing and wellness center on the island in the near future.

Paul Penders Responds to Global Finance Crisis

Consumers worldwide are feeling the pain of recession. Although they still need to look and feel their best, most have less money to spend. Paul Penders is responding to this crisis by lowering the cost of its products.

The all-natural ingredients and manufacturing of all products will remain the same, thereby preserving their high quality, safety and excellent results. What will change will be the packaging: instead of using relatively expensive containers, Paul Penders products will be packaged in beautiful, but more functional containers that offer greater economy.

The new packages will feature the same fresh look as currently used in Paul Penders products sold in China: elegant green pegaga leaves against a classic white background. The change will affect Paul Penders skin care and cosmetic products, with new packaging available in February or March. The hair care line will not be affected.

Paul Penders will also implement other cost effective ways of working that will contribute to lower product prices.

Nanomaterials Seen as Potential Danger

According to the U.K.’s Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, the pace at which new nanomaterials are reaching the market is beyond the capacity of existing testing and regulatory arrangements.

Nanomaterials are routinely incorporated into skincare products, particularly those labelled as “anti-aging” or “regenerative”.

Although the Commission notes that there is no evidence that nanomaterials harm either human health or the environment, it emphasizes that the amount of testing on such materials has been very limited.

Furthermore, laboratory tests on some nanoscale particles suggest they could pose dangers.

Some progress can be made by extending the current REACH regulations to cover nanoparticles. REACH imposes a responsibility on those who import and manufacture chemicals to identify, and provide information, on any potential health threats. The law’s limit of one ton (under which the chemicals are exempt from regulation) may be too high, as nanoparticles are often used in very small quantities.

The Commission recommends a checklist system for materials not covered by the REACH system, where manufacturers would be obliged by law to provide information about the potential risks posed by the materials throughout the product life cycle, including disposal by the consumer. An environmental monitoring system is also needed, along with the development of techniques to detect nanomaterials in the environment and living organisms.
According to the U.K.’s Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution, the pace at which new nanomaterials are reaching the market is beyond the capacity of existing testing and regulatory arrangements.

Nanomaterials are routinely incorporated into skincare products, particularly those labelled as “anti-aging” or “regenerative”.

Although the Commission notes that there is no evidence that nanomaterials harm either human health or the environment, it emphasizes that the amount of testing on such materials has been very limited.

Furthermore, laboratory tests on some nanoscale particles suggest they could pose dangers.

Some progress can be made by extending the current REACH regulations to cover nanoparticles. REACH imposes a responsibility on those who import and manufacture chemicals to identify, and provide information, on any potential health threats. The law’s limit of one ton (under which the chemicals are exempt from regulation) may be too high, as nanoparticles are often used in very small quantities.

The Commission recommends a checklist system for materials not covered by the REACH system, where manufacturers would be obliged by law to provide information about the potential risks posed by the materials throughout the product life cycle, including disposal by the consumer. An environmental monitoring system is also needed, along with the development of techniques to detect nanomaterials in the environment and living organisms.